Best All-Around Camouflage Pattern Across Multiple Biomes


Camo Pattern

When you’re out hunting, you want to blend in with your environment as well as you can to remain well-hidden from game. Generally, you’d choose an outfit that blends with a particular area. But what can you do when you’re hunting in multiple biomes in one day?

The best all-around camouflage pattern across multiple biomes is to choose a digital camo design. These patterns have a general digital print in grays, browns, and green, meant to blend with whichever of those colors are most prominent wherever you are.

Read on to learn more about the best camouflage patterns for use across multiple hunting environments. This article will discuss why multipurpose hunting gear is essential and reveal recommendations for versatile camouflage patterns. 

Best Camouflage Patterns for Hunting

Camouflage is meant to conceal a hunter at close range so that they can make an ethical shot. This means that the camouflage pattern you wear really matters and that it needs to suit your particular environment.

Generally, you’ll have the choice between two different kinds of camouflage patterns: mimicry and breakup. A lot of these are “digital camo”, which blurs the hunter’s outline and matches the environment’s colors

My one size fits all recommendation is this is the shirt (Click for Amazon Listing) with these pants. They will help you blend in across many environments, especially those with a lot of dark colors, greens, and grays. They make you dang near invisible when up a tree in many forest environments.

If you need something with a bit more browns or tans in it, go with this shirt and this pair of pants made by Sitka or these made by Under Armour. They work well in grassland or around fall and early winter.

By Style & Color

Most camouflage patterns fit into one of the following categories, based on the style and colors:

  • Woodland: browns for late fall and early spring, greens for summer
  • Brush: open patterns with little contrast, light browns
  • Waterfowl or Marsh: typically the most specialized, grassy prints
  • Snow/Winter: white with dark colors for contrast

By Country Region

You’ll also find camouflage categorized according to the country region where you’ll be hunting: 

  • North: light and dark colors mixed for blending with trees
  • South: full colors to blend with lush vegetation
  • East: all-purpose camouflage, many environments
  • West: earth tones to blend with brush, grasses, and rock

By Prey

Finally, some retailers will divide camouflage types by the kind of prey you’ll be hunting:

  • Waterfowl: Because ducks can see colors, blending colors with the environment is especially important.
  • Turkey: Due to the turkey’s great eyesight, concealing everything, including the hands and face, is important.
  • Deer/Big Game: These animals have limited color perception but can pick out a human silhouette.

But of course, you may want to hunt more than one kind of game or hunt in different environments without having to change outfits every time. Thankfully, there are solutions for when you’re hunting in multiple biomes.

What To Wear When You’re Hunting in Multiple Biomes

Ideally, your camouflage should be suited to the biome where you’re hunting, whether that’s a marsh, a forest, or a snowy landscape. Some biomes have shared color schemes and can blend with the same kinds of specialized camouflage. For example, Mossy Oak produces three different camouflage lines that work for leafy areas, river beds, and forests. 

However, these lines of camouflage are not ideal for marsh and waterfowl biomes. Mossy Oak produces separate lines for these and other biomes. 

So, you might ask what the best camouflage is to wear if you’re hunting in multiple biomes in one day, assuming you don’t want to carry and change clothes. You can mix patterns on your own or simply choose a pattern that fits your most common hunting spot. 

Or, you can choose a multipurpose camouflage pattern.

Multipurpose camouflage patterns blend in with multiple environments. They don’t include a lot of images unless they’re blurred and instead have a combination of irregular shapes, all in muted colors. Multipurpose camouflage patterns are the best choice when you’re hunting across different environments because they adapt well.

When Should You Wear Orange?

Some states mandate that hunters wear orange to keep them safe from other hunters. Because deer and big game don’t see colors very well, this is unlikely to make your job of concealing yourself harder in these cases. But what about when you’re hunting waterfowl, known for their excellent vision?

Although requirements vary by state, there are often exceptions to the rule for when you’re hunting ducks, turkey, or other game that’s likely to pick up on color and that looks less like a human from a distance. It also makes a difference in some states whether or not you’re hunting during deer hunting season. 

Generally, the rule that hunters must wear orange is relevant for those who hunt big game and doesn’t take away from the camouflage’s effect. 

Product Recommendations: Versatile Hunting Camo

When you’re looking to hunt across different environments, you’ll need something versatile to blend with different shapes and colors. Your best bet will generally be a digital camo design with a mix of browns and greens unless you’re looking to hunt in wintry conditions.  

Read on for our recommendations for the best, most versatile camouflage to wear when hunting in multiple environments. 

TrueTimber Strata Camo

The TrueTimber Strata Camo is a light to a dark brown and green pattern made for every environment, from mixed forests in the American South to leaf barren hardwood forests to the American West. This camo is all-purpose, incorporating macro and micro camouflage patterns into one and using form-blending false edges.

Badlands Approach Camo

The Badlands Approach Camo is based on grayscale coloration, appearing differently according to the light in different environments. This allows the hunter to blend in more effectively by adapting their appearance in different situations.

Cabela’s Outfitter Camo

Cabela’s Outfitter Camo has a more open pattern than most patterns on the market, made from muted grays and greens that combine to form a shadowy look. This look blends in a range of environments, from pine and cedar forests to the open country.

Mossy Oak Break-Up Country Camo 

Mossy Oak’s Break-Up Country Camo is made to combine the strategies of mimicry and break-up patterns with a shadowy pattern of browns and greens that allow you to hunt in different environments at all hours.

MultiCam Camo

MultiCam Camo is built to work well across different environments, with a digital print that mixes khaki with browns and greens. The range of hues also works well, regardless of the time of day or where your hunting venture takes you.

Natural Gear Camo

Natural Gear Camo is made from soft-edged images of elements from nature, blending together to form a kind of digital pattern. This camouflage pattern is grey and brown, meant to blend with most natural wooded environments. 

Kryptek

Kryptek Camo was designed for the U.S. Army and is useful in a range of woodland and desert environments. It’s a digital pattern that blends well, made with khaki, browns, and greens. This pattern works well in different light conditions, seasons, and elevations. 

A-TACS (Advanced Tactical Concealment System)

A-TACS Camo is currently used by the U.S. military and is useful for blending into an environment that’s not very well-defined. This digital pattern blurs your edges into the environment and comes in different hues depending on your preference.

Want to Make Your Own?

If you are into fabricating your own hunting clothes, I highly recommend using multicam pattern camo. It blends well across numerous biomes including woodlands, grasslands, and even deserts or snowy environments. It’s a great one size fits all option.

Conclusion

It’s best to find hunting gear and apparel that matches your hunting environment as closely as possible. Still, if you’re hunting in multiple environments in one outing, you’ll want to make sure that you’re concealed in both biomes. Versatile patterns like Natural Gear Camo can make all the difference to your experience.

Jim James

Hey, I'm Jim and the author of this website. I have always been interested in survival, fishing, camping, and anything in nature. In fact, while growing up I spent more time on the water than on land! I am also a best-selling author and have a degree in History, Anthropology, and Music. I hope you find value in the articles on this website. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or input!

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